Documentary about life of ‘Rosary Priest’ Ven. Patrick Peyton to be released by media ministry he founded

LOS ANGELES — “PRAY: The Story of Patrick Peyton,” a documentary film about Ven. Patrick Peyton C.S.C., the famous Hollywood Rosary priest who was dedicated to inspiring millions of families to pray together and coined the famous phrase, “The family that prays together stays together,” will release in select theaters nationwide Friday, Oct. 9.

“PRAY” is produced by Family Theater Productions, the same Hollywood organization founded by Fr. Patrick Peyton, and will be distributed by ArtAffects.

“We now have the opportunity to bring ‘PRAY’ to theaters where families will be able to experience the powerful and hopeful message of family prayer,” said Holy Cross Father David Guffey, national director of Family Theater Productions and executive producer of “PRAY.”

Founded in 1947 by Fr. Peyton, and headquartered on Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, Family Theater Productions is an award-winning producer of family media, including television, radio and short format video for all the major social platforms. Its mission is to create family and faith-based media that inspires, entertains and informs.

“PRAY” chronicles the life of Fr. Peyton, a poor, uneducated Irish immigrant who set sail for America in 1928 with nothing but his faith and dreams of becoming a millionaire. Arriving in Pennsylvania and unable to find work, he accepted a job as janitor at the Catholic cathedral, which rekindled his long-lost desire to become a priest and changed the course of his life.

“‘PRAY’ is more than a movie, it’s a prayer movement. We want to encourage families to watch this remarkable movie that focuses on the transformative power of prayer,” Fr. Guffey said. “Fr. Patrick Peyton inspired millions with his message of family prayer. Our goal in the film’s accompanying Pray Together Now movement is 10 million globally pledging to pray daily with those they love.”

Nearing ordination, his life took a radical turn when he was stricken with tuberculosis. Facing certain death, he sank into despair. A visit from his mentor, who delivered a simple message to pray, lifted the darkness. Taking his advice to heart, Peyton prayed fervently to Mary, the Mother of Christ, for her intercession and he experienced a miraculous recovery.

Ven. Patrick Peyton, CSC, ‘The Rosary Priest’

Jan. 9, 1909:
Born in Attymass, County Mayo, Ireland
June 15, 1941:
Ordained for the Congregation of Holy Cross
Jan. 25, 1947:
Established Family Rosary Crusade Movement
June 3, 1992:
Died
June 1, 2001:
Named Servant of God
Dec. 18, 2017:
Declared Venerable

“‘PRAY’ is an exceptional movie about an exceptional man, produced at an exceptional time in our history as a nation and Church,” said Dr. Julia M. Dezelski, assistant director of marriage and family life at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Secretariat of Laity, Marriage, Family Life and Youth.

Feeling a deep gratitude to God, Fr. Peyton dedicated his life to telling all the world about the power of prayer and encouraged families worldwide to bring prayer into their homes. He enlisted the aid of Hollywood’s biggest celebrities in radio, film and TV, and traveled the world sharing the message of family prayer and its healing and hope with millions.

“It is absolutely vital for families to experience the ‘glue’ that is family prayer, especially the Rosary. As a child, my family was glued together by the Rosary,” recalled Dezelski. “Still today, even with a toddler and baby, the Rosary has a daily place in our lives as a family. I recommend this movie to families everywhere: watch it and let it transform you into a family that prays together; it will make a lasting difference!”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s